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Diamond Neighborhoods Collective Impact Data

The Jacobs Center has partnered with UCSD Extension to collect data on the Diamond Neighborhoods in hopes that this data will empower organizations and residents to continually enhance the social and economic well-being of San Diego’s Diamond Neighborhoods. The following document includes data on demographics, local economy, health, education, and the physical environment that the research team has analyzed thus far.

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Art + Design Plan

This plan provides residents, community partners, developers, and funders with the vision for an arts and culture district in the Diamond Neighborhoods that was identified through a nine-month community input process in 2012. The plan outlines common themes that public art in the community should express, as well as possible art forms and priority locations. The Art + Design Plan also includes design guidelines for future developments, as well as an implementation strategy and recommendations for supporting this vision.

An Executive Summary is available as an overview of the larger Art + Design Plan.

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Activating Chollas Creek through Art & Sustainable Design

Furthering the 2002 Chollas Creek Enhancement Program, the Activating Chollas Creek Through Art & Sustainable Design plan, aims to transform Chollas Creek from a hidden and neglected waterway into a linear urban park, becoming a historic, geographic, symbolic and civic focal point. It will activate a key portion of Chollas Creek, located at the northwest corner of Euclid Avenue and Market Street in the Encanto Neighborhood of San Diego. Through this work, the Creek will once again become the community’s heart and soul, restoring the inner energy and inherent need for nature in each of its residents.

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Learning Series
Community Contractors Program

As a result of a commitment to hire locally that was made before the first building in The Village at Market Creek was designed, each phase of development set an ambitious goal for the percentage of contracts awarded to local construction businesses. A different approach was used to reach that goal in each of three phases, and this report details the third of those approaches – the development of the Construction Working Team with local community members and construction industry veterans – and lessons learned.

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Learning Series
Resident Compensation

The Jacobs Center’s work has included carefully considered instances where the organization has compensated residents for their participation. This report outlines three such cases – the Neighborhood Coordinators Training Program, the Construction Working Team, and VOCAL – that took place at specific junctures in our work and looks at some of the benefits, challenges, and learnings from this strategy.

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Learning Series
Arts as a Civic Engagement Strategy

While the Jacobs Center’s initial outreach and organizing strategy was not developed with an arts and culture component in mind, it soon became clear that we were most successful at engaging residents and building stronger, more diverse, and more cohesive resident teams when we led with learning opportunities and dialogue around the community’s many cultures. This paper looks at the arts and culture-based engagement goals and strategic pathways that resulted from our early experiences, as well as our learnings and next steps.

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Impact Sheets

The Impact Sheets provide an overview of specific areas of our work. They also provide statistical data on programs and initiatives in key focus areas.

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Community Development IPO – Market Creek Plaza Evaluation Synthesis Report

This report details the development of Market Creek Plaza’s Community Development Initial Public Offering (IPO) and the pathways that resulted in local ownership and community change. It also offers lessons learned for future initiatives striving to uplift communities through individual development and community capacity building.

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Resident-Centered Community Building – What Makes It Different?

In June 2012, 41 leaders of community building efforts came together to share strategies and discuss lessons they have learned about how to improve conditions in disadvantaged communities.

This report summarizes community builders’ lessons, conclusions, and suggestions for future work. It identifies a set of ingredients that are needed for effective resident-centered community building but does not offer a recipe for putting them together because each community has its own unique history, conditions, capacities, and potential. Rather, the themes introduced here are the basic building blocks that experienced community builders have learned are essential for community work to succeed. It also provides guiding principles for those who support resident-centered community change efforts.

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Toolkit

The toolkit is a supplement for the Resident-Centered Community Building report. It was created to assist you in engaging residents in your work in a meaningful way that puts residents at the forefront of the work, and helps build long-term, sustainable relationships. It is critical that you first read the Resident-Centered Community Building report prior to utilizing this toolkit.

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Brownfields Area-Wide Planning Action Plan

The Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation was awarded a Brownfields Area-Wide Planning Pilot Program Grant from the United States Environmental Protection Agency to study and develop strategies for remediation and land for specific brownfield sites owned by the Jacobs Center. This project provides funding for the Jacobs Center to conduct area-wide planning for the Diamond Neighborhoods located in Southeastern San Diego and Encanto Community Planning areas. The Jacobs Center will continue its mission of resident-led change by utilizing existing partnerships with residents, community groups, private agencies, and government agencies and by expanding the land-use planning process launched in early 2010 for an area-wide Village at Market Creek plan to more specifically address brownfields mitigation and land reuse.